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I think it is QUITE clear

14 Nov

that Mueller is Hell-bent on “getting” Trump by hook or by crook, while Hillary was given a pass on very obvious corruption.

See, this kind of crap damages the rule of law. The founders outlawed titles of nobility for a very good reason. It subverts the rule of law. And to see Mueller act this way both besmirches and trivializes the law. When one person get lenient treatment because the prosecutor likes them and another gets reamed because the prosecutor doesn’t like them, it makes the whole rule of law thing collapse.

Thus, we are seeing many people say that they don’t give a flying fig what Mueller says now. It is patently obvious that it is a miscarriage of justice. And if I were one of the accused, I would fight it to the Supreme Court.

I am for justice, and this is grossly unfair.

See, this is an attack on the rule of law itself. You have the double whammy of Hillary treated with kid gloves and DT hammered. I accept my speeding ticket in large part because I know everyone┬áplays by the same rules. But if “Joe” can go 30 MPH above the speed limit with impunity and yet I get prosecuted for going 2 MPH over, the whole thing breaks down.

The Hillary thing was NOT just about her staying out of prison. It was about the rule of law. In was about fairness.

And MOST people recognize that she is a criminal. They may agree with her political stances, they may have voted for her (or some lame 3rd-party candidate, which is, in fact, aiding and abetting Hillary), but they recognize that she is a slimy git.

She, like her slimy git husband, is perfectly willing to destroy the Republic in order to get gain for herself and to avoid the law. But when there is one law for “nobility” and another one for “regular” people, the system just can’t survive.

 
 

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  1. Oregonian

    November 14, 2017 at 12:56 pm

    Good post.

    We don’t have titles of nobility here but it always cracks me up when doctors (MDs or PHDs) include those initials on their non-professional correspondence (e.g., letters to the editor or return address labels).

    When I read a letter to the editor about some non-medical item and the author signs it Jane Doe, MD I think “wow, who cares?…Now I’m not going to pay attention to anything you wrote.”

     
    • Gregor Mendel

      November 14, 2017 at 5:04 pm

      I totally agree. Many physicians are so freakin’ full of themselves that they think their options on non-medical things are worth diddly-squat. They are not. These folks are glorified technicians, and I very much appreciate their skills. But outside of their areas of expertise they are no more reliable than anyone else.